28 December 2018

Enter is In-treda

According to oldschool etymology, the verb enter is derived from Old French entrer, which can be derived from Latin intrare "to go into, enter". To explain the Latin word, it would make sense to split it as in-trare. However, trare is not a word.

The Latin word can more easily be explained through Germanic languages:

in-treden - Dutch
ein-treten - German
tre-inn - Norse (all: to go into, enter)

Related words in some other languages:
to tread - English
trêdzje - Frisian
träda - Swedish
træde - Danish
tree - Afrikaans
(possibly: τρέχω (to run) - old-Greek)

Two varieties of the word appear in the Oera Linda-book:


verb, 3rd person, past tense
[006/29] WR.ALDA.S OD TRÀD TO RA BINNA.
literally: Wralda's 'od'* treaded into them (or: They received Wralda's 'od' into them)
Dutch: "trad binnen"
(*od: unclear, possibly a word for semen or the male reproductive organ)


noun, plural
[024/28] THÀT HI FON ALLE SIDUM SJVGUN HVNDRED TRÉDUN UT OF SINE HUS MÉI HLAPA
that he can walk seven hundred steps [lit. treads] from all sides out of his house
Dutch: "treden"

Young woman treads into a labyrinth (fragment of Dutch print ca. 1630)

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