16 September 2016

JFKJA ~ possible name meaning

~ ~ ~ for my son Ibe Alwin ~ ~ ~


[155/11]
THAHWILA A.DEL TO TEX.LÁND INNA LÉRE WÉRE.
WAS THÉR TEFTA EN ÉLLE LJAWE FÁM INVPPER BURCH.
HJU KÉM FONUT THA SAXANA.MARKUM WÉI.
FONUT.ÉRE STÁTHA THÉR IS KÉTHEN SVÔBA.LÁND
THÉRTHRVCH WÀRTH HJU TO TEX.LÁND SVÔBENE HÉTEN.
ÀFSKÉN HJRA NÔME JFKJA WÉRE.

(Sandbach, p.209)
While Adel was studying at Texland
there was a lovely maiden at the citadel.
She came from Saxenmarken,
from the state of Suobaland,
therefore she was called at Texland Suobene,
although her name was Ifkja.


OLB-words that end with -KJA are mostly verbs: WÁKJA, MÁKJA, BAKJA, LAKKJA, THÀNKJA, PLOKJA.

However, BUKJA [073/21] is a diminutive.

One verb ends with -TJA (WACHTJA) and so do several women's names: SYTJA, JALTJA, TÜNTJA, TUTJA, RÉINTJA

from: The herball
by John Gerard 1597
Many Westfrisian women's names are simply the diminutive from the male variant:

Jantje, Dirkje, Cornelisje, etc.

Ibe, IJf, Ivo, Ives, Uwe, etc. are man's names that are derived from a significant tree, the yew, which was famous for its strong and flexible wood - perfect for making bows - its long life (2000 year old trees are known) and both poison and medicine that can be made of it. (The red berries are edible, but NOT their seeds!)

Many scholars believe that the Yggdrasill from pre-Christian tradition must have been a yew. There must have been many more yews in Europe, but during wars many were cut for making weapons and since their growth is very slow, there are relatively few left. At the other hand, some of the oldest wooden artefacts were made from the yew tree.
One of the world's oldest surviving wooden artefacts is a Clactonian yew spear head, found in 1911 at Clacton-on-Sea, in Essex, UK. It is estimated to be about 450,000 years old.
[...]
In traditional Germanic paganism, Yggdrasill was often seen as a giant ash tree. Many scholars now agree that in the past an error has been made in the interpretation of the ancient writings, and that the tree is most likely a European yew (Taxus baccata). This mistake would find its origin in an alternative word for the yew tree in the Old Norse, namely needle ash (barraskr). In addition, ancient sources, including the Eddas, speak about a vetgrønster vida which means "evergreen tree". An ash sheds its leaves in the winter, while yew trees retain their needles. (source)
A female version of this name could then have been JFKJA or IFKJA. In Dutch, the name Yfke, Iefke or Iefkje is known.

(taxus baccata - binomial name)
yew - English
Eibe - German (old names: Iben-, Ifen-, Iwenbaum, Ybe, etc.)
ijf - Dutch (old spellings: iwa, ieve, hiewe, uwe)
yf - Afrikaans
if - French
ivin - Breton
ewin - Cornish
ive - Latvian
ýviður, ýr - Icelandic
yr, ir - Danish, Old-Norse
idegran - swedish
(barlind - norse)

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