01 June 2012

Forum # 22 (apr. 3 - 21, 2012)


Posted 03 April 2012 - 08:12 PM
Found two treasures:
Bediedinge van de tot noch toe onbekende afgodinne Nehalennia
(Service of the untill-now-unknown goddess/ idol Nehalennia)
by Marcus Zuerius Boxhorn (1647)
and
Taalkundige aanmerkingen op eenige Oud-Friesche spreekwoorden
(Linguistic notes to some Old-frisian proverbs)
by Jacob Henrik Hoeufft (1812)

### Posted 09 April 2012 - 04:00 PM
From the website of the publisher of the Southafrican translation of the OLB, by Adriaan Snyman (1998, http://vaandel.co.za/?page_id=12 , underlinings by me ):
"Tydens 'n Volkekundige Kongres in Parys, Frankryk, het 'n taalkenner uit Istanboel die kongreslede laat regop sit toe hy aan die hand van Die Oera Linda Boek 'bewys' het dat Afrikaans se wortels direk na hierdie ou beskawing teruggevoer kan word."

translated:
"At an ethnological congress in Paris, a language expert from Istanbul shook up the Congress members when he used the book to 'prove' that the roots of the Dutch-Afrikan language can directly be traced back to this ancient civilization."

=> Can anyone tell me who this Turkish language expert might have been?

### Posted 10 April 2012 - 07:18 AM
Knul, on 10 April 2012 - 12:21 AM, said:
All this shows the literary quality of the OLB, which has not yet been investigated.
According to me there are more different styles in the OLB, resulting in different wordings and different spellings. Please let me know, if you come across such pecularities.

I agree. Very good point.
One of the things I noticed, is a difference in the average length of sentences (and parts of sentences), between some of the different texts.

Sometimes the tildes ( ~ ~ ~ ) are used to fill out space (example p.7,8), somtimes to create reading brakes (example p.83,84).

### Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:42 PM
No slave of another, nor of his ...?
==>> see seperate post "TOCHTA = THOUGHTS" on Fryskednis

### Posted 13 April 2012 - 12:46 PM
Example of rude Westfrisian wordplay

I found the following expression in the dictionary of Westfrisian (NH) dialect by Jan Pannekeet (1984), under "denke" (to think):

"Ik docht... jij dochte... jij dochte niks! Je dochters benne hoerekindere, die loupe in Den Haag"
 - grove reactie en woordspeling aan het adres van iemand die dacht iets op de juiste manier gedaan te hebben.

Translation:
"I thought... you thought... you thought nothing! Your 'daughters' ('thoughters') are whoreschildren, they walk the streets in The Hague"
 - rude reply and wordplay directed to someone who thought to have done something in the right way

### Posted 14 April 2012 - 02:29 PM
View PostOtharus, on 04 February 2012 - 05:49 PM, said:
Since "Neef Teunis" in the OLB has been one of the main arguments to not take it seriously...
In my Old-Greek dictionary (Halberstadt, 1900);
translations between {..} added by me:

ἀ νεψι ός, ἀ νεψι ά = neef, nicht (broers- of zusterskinderen) {cousin (children of brothers or sisters)}
ἀ νεψι άδης, -άδοῦς = zoon van een neef of nicht {son of cousin}
ἀ νεψι ότης, -ητος = bloedverwantschap {consanguinity}
νέποδες = jongen, nakomelingen {youngs, offspring}

My Latin dictionary (Kramers, 1987):
nepos = 1. kleinzoon, plur.: afstammelingen, nakomelingen; 2. neef; 3. verkwister {1. grandson, plur. offspring, descendants; 2. cousin; 3. waster}
neptis = kleindochter {granddaughter}

On the web ( http://en.wiktionary...ἀνεψιός ):
ἀνεψιός

From Proto-Indo-European *népōts. Cognates include Sanskrit and Avestan (napāt), Latin nepōs, and Old English nefa.

a first-cousin, cousin

~ ~ ~
Conclusion:
The suggestion made in OLB, that the origin of the name Neptune would be cousin or relative Tunis, is not as absurd as claimed by hoax-believers. In fact, it can hardly mean anything else.

Naphtali (Redirected from Nephthalim)
According to the Book of Genesis, Naphtali ( /ˈnæftəlaɪ/; Hebrew: נַפְתָּלִי, Modern Naftali Tiberian Nap̄tālî ; "My struggle") was the second son of Jacob with Bilhah.
 (wiki) Greek: Nefthal(e)ím

~ ~ ~
Nephele
Punishment of Ixion: Nephele sitting at Mercury's feet. Roman fresco in Pompeii.
In Greek mythology, Nephele (Greek: Νεφέλη, from νέφος nephos "cloud"; Latinized to Nubes) was a cloud nymph who figured prominently in the story of Phrixus and Helle.
 (wiki)


### Posted 14 April 2012 - 07:32 PM
One of the most beautiful fragments of the OLB:

[093/13]
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ THET ÔTHERA SKRIFT. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ .
FIFTIAN MONATHA NÉI THÉRE LERSTE ACHT.
WÉR ET FRJUNSKIP JEFTHA WINNE MÔNATH.
ALLERA MÀNNELIK JEF TO AN MERY FRU ÀND BLÍDE
ÀND NINMAN NÉDE DIGER THAN TO ÁKANE SINA NOCHT.
THACH VVR.ALDA WILDVS WÍSA
THÀT WÁKENDOM NAVT VRGAMLATH WRDE NE MÉI.
~ ~ ~
TO MIDNE FONET FÉST-FÍRJA
KÉM NÉVIL TO HULLANDE VSA VVRDA IN THIKKE THJUSTERNISE.
NOCHT RUNDE WÉI.
THA WÁKENDOM NILDE NAVT NE KÉRA.
~
THA STRANDWÁKAR WÉRON FON HJARA NÉD-FJURA HLÁPEN.
AND VPPA THA TO PÁDUM NAS NÉNEN TO BISJA.
~ .
THÁ NÉVIL EWÉI TÁCH
LOKTE SVNNE THRVCH THA RÉTA THÉRA WOLKUM VP JRTHA.
ALREK KÉM WITHER UT.
TO JUWGANDE ÀND TO JOLANDE.
THET JUNGK-FOLK TÁCH SJONGANDE MITHA GÜRBÁM
ÀND THISSE OVER-FULDE LUFT MITH SINA LIAFLIKA ÁDAM.
MEN THAHWILA THÉR ALREK IN NOCHT BÁJADE WAS VRRÉD LÁND.
MITH HORSUM AND RIDDERUM.
~ .
LIK ALLE ÀRGA WÉRON HJA HELPEN THRVCH THJUSTERNISSE.
ÀND HINNE GLUPATH THRVCH LINDA-WALD.IS PÁDA.

~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ -

NÉVIL
Ottema: nevel
Sandbach: fog

mist, cloud, fog

nifl - oldnorse
nevil - oldfrisian (Richthofen, 1840)
nebbal - oldsaxon

nevel - dutch
newel - afrikaans
niwl - welsch
nebel - german
niebla - spanish
névoa - portuguese
nebbia - italian

νεφέλη - greek
nebula - latin (cloud)
nuvola - italian
nube - spanish
nuvem - portuguese
núvol - catalan
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ -

The German Nibelungen — with the corresponding Old Norse form Niflung (Niflungr) — is the name in Germanic and Norse mythology of the royal family or lineage of the Burgundians who settled in the early 5th century at Worms.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nibelung

The Nephilim (plural) are the offspring of the "sons of God" and the "daughters of men" in Genesis 6:4, or giants who inhabit Canaan in Numbers 13:33. A similar word with different vowel-sounds is used in Ezekiel 32:27 to refer to dead Philistine warriors.
Etymology
"Nephilim" (נְפִילִים) probably derives from the Hebrew root npl (נָפַל), "to fall" which also includes "to cause to fall" and "to kill, to ruin". The Brown-Driver-Briggs Lexicon gives the meaning as "giants" Robert Baker Girdlestone argued the word comes from the Hiphil causative stem. Adam Clarke took it as passive, "fallen", "apostates". Ronald Hendel states that it is a passive form "ones who have fallen", equivalent grammatically to paqid "one who is appointed" (i.e. overseer), asir, "one who is bound", (i.e. prisoner) etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephilim

"probably"? I don't think so.
~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ - ~ -
Remember that the Greek priests who deified Minerva, and created a mythology around her, told the people that God had sent her on a cloud?

### Posted 14 April 2012 - 08:03 PM
View PostAbramelin, on 14 April 2012 - 07:54 PM, said:
Ever heard of "Indo-European"??
You don't get it, ey?

niflung - neveling - nephilim ('giants')
nothing aliens or sons of the gods, just some tall people from the foggy north

### Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:29 AM
Of course I'm not suggesting that the 'Nephilim' from the bible are the Niflungen from the Edda, or the Nibelungen from the 'Nibelungenlied'.

Only that it has the same meaning;
Dutch: "nevelingen"; people from the mist, fog, cloud(s)

Rather than "fallen ones", which is not more than a hypothesis, but loads of people base their belief that they were aliens on it ('those who fell from heaven').

And that it makes more sense that they were just tall people from the North (just like the 'giants' and 'gods' of Roman and Greek mythology), than that they were supernatural giants, aliens or sons of god.

### Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:48 PM
Just thinking out loud...

Nef-thalim
Nef-ele
Nef-tunis

=> all descendants from the 'Nef-ilim' or 'Nefil-im'??
=> nef, nep, naf, nap = relative, cousin, grandchild, kinsmen??

### Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:06 PM
I will go even further.

Hettema Oldfrisisan dictionary (1874):

jahweder, iahwelik, jawelic, iahuelc, iahuelkre = every
every = all

[004/18]
THIU MODER ÀND JAHWELIK BURCH.FÁM SKIL HÀVA ...
[O+S p.9]
De moeder en elke burgtmaagd zal hebben ...
that every Volksmoeder [the Mother] and every Burgtmaagd [burgh-matron] shall have ...

[010/11]
SAHWERSA HJU.T DÉDE. WÉRE.T TO JAHWELIKIS NOT
[O+S p.17]
wanneer zij het deed, was het tot nut van iedereen
when she did it it was for the general use [=> to everyone's need]

[033/18]
TO THA LESTA KLÀPPATH HJA SLÁVONA.BANDA OM JAHWELIKES FRYA HALS
[O+S p.49]
ten laatste sluiten zij slavenbanden om een ieders vrijen hals
at last [they] throw the bonds of slavery over every freeman's neck [=> around everyone's free neck]

[036/17]
HI WIL. ÁK THÀT JAHWEDER FRY SY ÀND WIS WRDE
[O+S p.53]
hij wil ook dat iedereen vrij zij en wijs worde
[he also wants] that all should be free and wise

[041/14]
JAHWÉDER JONG KERDEL ÁCH EN BRUD TO SÉKA
[O+S p.59]
Ieder jong man behoort eene bruid te zoeken [=> iedere jonge kerel]
Every young man ought to seek a bride

[057/24]
THÉR ÀFTER MACHT JAHWÉDER KIASA HWAM ER FOLGJA WILDE
[O+S p.81]
Daarna mocht ieder kiezen, wien hij volgen wilde
[after that] Every man could choose which he pleased

[066/06]
JAHWEDER TOCHTE THÀT HJU INNA LOGHA OMKVMA MOSTE
[O+S p.93]
iedereen meende dat zij in de vlammen moest omkomen
they [everyone] thought she must be killed in the flames

[102/27]
THAT ER JAHWEDER ÁGEBLIK WIXLATH
[O+S p.141]
dat hij ieder oogenblik wisselt
that he changes every minute [=> literally every 'blink-of-the-eye']

[122/17]
JAHWÉDER STAND RÉD VMB SÉ TO KJASANE
[O+S p.167]
ieder stond gereed om zee te kiezen
we were all [stood] ready to cast ourselves into the [choose] sea

[123/26]
THÉRNÉI SKIL JAHWEDER SÁ FÜL GOLD KRÉJA AS.ER BÉRA MÉI
[O+S p.169]
Daarna zal ieder zooveel goud krijgen, als hij tillen kan
after that each shall receive as much gold as he can carry

[142/27]
ALONT ET HEL ÀND KLÀR IN JÁHWLIKES HIRT ÀND HOLLE WÀRTH
[O+S p.193]
totdat het helder en klaar wordt in ieders hart en hoofd
until every man's head and heart has become bright and clear
[=> until it becomes bright and clear in everyone's heart and head]

[150/29]
BI JAHWEDER HORS WÉRON TVVÉN JONGA SÉ.KÀMPAR ...
[O+S p.205]
Bij ieder paard waren twee jonge zeekampers ...
With each horse there were two young sea-rovers ...

[190/30]
JAHWEDER MÀN IS THENE FÉDER FON SIN HÚSHALDEN
[O+S p.231]
ieder man is de vader (voeder) van zijn huisgezin
every man is the father (feeder) of his household

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Summary

JAHWELIK BURCH.FÁM = every burgh-matron
TO JAHWELIKIS NOT = to everyone's need
OM JAHWELIKES FRYA HALS = around everyone's free neck
THÀT JAHWEDER FRY SY = that everyone be free
JAHWÉDER JONG KERDEL = every young man
JAHWÉDER MACHT KIASA = everyone could choose
JAHWEDER TOCHTE = everyone thought
JAHWEDER ÁGEBLIK = every moment ('blink-of-the-eye')
JAHWÉDER STAND RÉD = everyone stood ready
JAHWEDER SKIL KRÉJA = everyone shall receive
JÁHWLIKES HIRT ÀND HOLLE = everyone's heart and head
BI JAHWEDER HORS = by every horse
JAHWEDER MÀN = every man

JAHWE-DER (in modern dutch: "ieder")
JAHWE-LIK (in modern dutch: "elk")
JAHWE-LIK-HIS

JAHWE = every = all

{collective (sub-)consciousness?}
Jahweh = Allah

### Posted 16 April 2012 - 06:29 AM
The proper construction is probably:

JA-HWEDER
JA-HWEL-(L)IK = (english:) yes-well-like? = (dutch:) ja-wel-lijk

... which does not mean that there can be no relation to the name the Juwes gave to the spirit of their dead ancestor.
The existing explanations have been very effective in confusing the peoples.

### Posted 16 April 2012 - 06:51 AM
Deuteronomy 19:1

New Living Translation (2007)
"When the LORD your God destroys the nations whose land he is giving you, you will take over their land and settle in their towns and homes."

English Standard Version (2001)
“When the LORD your God cuts off the nations whose land the LORD your God is giving you, and you dispossess them and dwell in their cities and in their houses,"

The bible (undated Leiden translation) that was given to my grandmother in 1931 (by the protestant church) has:
"Wanneer Jahwe, uw god, de volken uitroeit wier land Jahwe, uw god, u geeft, en gij hen verdrijft en in hun steden en huizen u vestigt,"

Translated:
"when Jahwe, your god, exterminates the peoples who's land Jahwe, your god, gives you, and you chase them away and settle in their cities and houses"

Pure war-propaganda and pretty disgusting IMO.

Did you notice how the modern translations ("destroys the nations"; "cuts off the nations") are made to look a bit more innocent?

### Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:40 PM
A touch of Frisian humor
The pleasure of trampling underfoot.
Seen (today) in conference- and exhibition room (Frisian literature) of Tresoar, the archive in Leeuwarden that guards the OLB.


### Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:38 AM
Abramelin, on 18 April 2012 - 09:33 AM, said:
From the OLB:
In early times almost all of Finda's people lived together in their homeland, called Aldland, which is now under the sea. They were thus far away and therefore we did not need to go to war.

According to the OLB, this is what was written on the walls of citadels in the 6th century BC.
According to the OLB, Aldland sank ca 22nd century BC.
So the era that the fragment describes was already 16 centuries passed (past), when it was copied from the citadel-walls.
Even if one takes the OLB seriously (if the manuscript was indeed preserved through many generations of the Over de Linden family), one should still be skeptical about the info in contains.
What I try to say is, that even if it's authentic, its information doesn't all have to be strict historical facts.

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:56 AM
Abramelin, on 18 April 2012 - 10:45 AM, said:
Are you suggesting that the submergence of Aldland could in fact be about the submergence of Doggerland, 8150 BP, which means some 4000 years earlier?

No, I don't think so myself, as I don't think that's where Inka would have went to search for remains.
The Fryans will have known the sea between Brittain an Scandinavia pretty well.
I think some of the information in OLB about Aldland is somehow contradicting, which is not surprising if the event was already that old.
Just think about how much we know of our own first Millennium AD!
Hardly anything!!!
The existing theories about that era also highly contradict eachother.

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:49 PM
LÉDLIK - LÉDLIKER - LÉDLIKST
(ugly - uglier - ugliest)

In a future publication I will list some of Jensma's most significant errors, not in order to blame him, but to plead for a new, deeper investigation.
Until then, I will post here whatever I find and consider mentionworthy.
This post is about his comment on the word "LÉDLIK", that appears three times in the OLB.
First the three fragments, with Sandbach's (slightly corrected) translation:

[096/16]
MEN AL WÉRE HJU LÉDLIK THACH SKOLDE HJU VS DJÚRA WÉSA
[Sandbach p.133]
But even if she had been ugly, she would still have been dear to us

[157/18]
NÉI DAM HJARA ÔNTHLITA THÉR BRUN BI WÉR
ALSA WRDON HJA THESTO LÉDLIKER THÉR THRVCH

[Sandbach p.213]
but as their faces remained brown,
they were only the more ugly


[207/22]
THA SKÉNNESTE WRDON HALDA VMBE VPPET LÁND TO BILÍWANE
ÀND THA LÉDLIKSTA ÀND SWARTSTE WRDON AN BORD HALDEN
VMBE VPPA THA BENKA TO ROJANDE

[Sandbach p.249]
The handsomest were retained ashore,
and the ugly and black [ugliest and blackest] were kept on board ship
as rowers [=> to row on the benches]


~
Now from Jensma's translation (2006), on p.263 (OLB p.96), in footnote:
"RH oneig lethlik, ledlik (=tamelijk, redelijk, nogal)"

translation:
"based on Richthofen's dictionary, improperly used, lethlik, ledlik (= rather, reasonably, quite)"

~
But here is what the three Oldfrisian dictionaries (that were available) say:

Wiarda (1786):
Leedlyk - heslich, böse (= ugly, evil)

Hettema (1832):
Leedlijk, lelk - leelijk (= ugly)

Richthofen (1840):
Lethlik, ledlik - leidig, leidhaft (= unpleasant, tiresome, vexatious, annoying; ?)

And even a Dutch etymological dictionary from 1911 (Pluim) already gave that the Dutch word "lelijk" (ugly) is derived from"leed-lijk" (grief-, pain-, sorrow-like).

~
So why was Jensma making things more complicated than they are?!

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:14 PM
Abramelin, on 18 April 2012 - 04:00 PM, said:
Because as we both know it is obvious Jensma was NO linguist.

Exactly! Not one single linguist (that I know of) has ever dared to burn fingers on publishing about the OLB.
I don't count Beckering's emotional mockery (1876), as he was just some teacher English, whose aim was - as he admitted - to ridicule the 'gibberish' ("worse than negroe-English!") of the OLB.
(This man was also convinced that Cornelis Over de Linden had made the manuscript all by himself.)
Jensma was simply parrotting Beckering in his starting point that the OLB-language obviously and undoubtedly had to be fake.

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 04:45 PM
The OLB describes the decline of a matriarchal civilisation.
==>> see seperate post on FRYSKEDNIS for the whole discussion about this

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:41 PM
Just in case I'm struck by lightning before I get to publish an oldschool book in answer to Jensma's, here's another niceJensmism I found.

First three OLB fragments with the verb "HIPPA" (to hop or jump), than his comment on it, followed by my reply.

[031/21]
FORSKA HROPATH WÀRK - WÀRK. ÀND HJA NE DVATH NAWET AS HIPPA ÀND KLUCHT MÁKJA
[Sandbach p.47]
The frog cries [Frogs cry] "Work, work;" but he can [they] do nothing but hop and make himself ridiculous [farce]

[096/31]
THÉR HIPTH HJU NÉI.T KRÍL.WOD
[Sandbach p.135]
Then she ran [???] to the Krylwood

[119/10]
THÁ HJA LANDA HIPTE.N JONG KERDEL WAL VP
[Sandbach p.163]
When they landed a young fellow jumped upon the rampart

~
Jensma (2006) on page 263 (OLB p.96) about "HIPTH" (translated):
"Hipt/hops - verb of movement, ment to be funny, compare [119/10], where Friso 'hops' ashore."
~

According to the Frisian online dictionary ( http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...emmodern=hippen ), the word is known from the dialects of Schiermonnikoog, Terschelling and Hindeloopen (which means the word is probably old), and it is used in literature from 1824 on.

Jensma read the OLB, assuming that it was ment to be funny.
People tend to see what they want to see.

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:51 PM
Abramelin, on 18 April 2012 - 04:00 PM, said:
He should have consulted Rolf Bremmer instead of trying it on his own.

Jensma mentions Bremmer in the prologue of his dissertation (2004).
Professor Bremmer was a member of the 'reading-committee'; he read the pre-print and gave comments and suggestions for improvement before Jensma was promoted and the book was published.

### Posted 18 April 2012 - 10:11 PM
View PostOtharus, on 18 April 2012 - 05:41 PM, said:
Jensma (2006) on page 263 (OLB p.96) about "HIPTH" (translated):
"Hipt/hops - verb of movement, ment to be funny, compare [119/10], where Friso 'hops' ashore."
~
According to the Frisian online dictionary ( http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...emmodern=hippen ), the word is known from the dialects of Schiermonnikoog, Terschelling and Hindeloopen (which means the word is probably old), and it is used in literature from 1824 on.
For Dutch & Frisian word-fetishists:

Frisian dictionary (Prisma 2011):
hippe = huppelen ~ "de lamkes hippe troch it gers" = de lammetjes huppelen door het gras; "dat hipt nau" = dat luistert nauw

Wesfrisian (NH) dictionary (Pannekeet 1984):
hip znw. (de) = afgeleid van hippe = huppelen; in zegswijze de hip niet kroige kenne = niet uit zijn stoel kunnen komen, er maar niet toe kunnen komen; op 'n hip en 'n drip = in een oogwenk (drip is een afleiding van drippen, variatie op dribbelen)
hippedrip = samentrekking van hip en drip, in zegswijze op 'n hippedrip = in een oogwenk
hipperdepip = variatie van hippedrip
hippert = afleiding van hippe = huppen, huppelen; in zegswijze hippert weze = zitten te hippen of huppen, opgewonden zijn, zitten te springen om iets te doen, te zeggen e.d.; hippert in z'n loif weze = opgewonden, in blijde spanning zijn (o.a. in Noord-Scharwoude)
hippie znw.('t); in zegswijze op 't hippie = 1. op het nippertje; 2. welhaast; vergelijk (Fries) "op it hipke"; zie ook zegswijze ze is de bruid op 't hippie (ze staat op trouwen, ze is er a.h.w. nog een hippie = hupje of sprongetje van af.); het woord is de verkleinvorm van hip, variatie hup.

### Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:19 AM
Abramelin, on 18 April 2012 - 11:43 PM, said:
Dutch "hippelen" or "huppelen" is "to hop" in English.

You'll probably not find this in an etymologybook, but I'm pretty sure that the cheers "hip hip hoera!" and "hup Holland hup!" are derived from these verbs.
And "Hieperdepiep" from Westfrisian "hippedrip?"

### Posted 20 April 2012 - 05:22 PM
Here's just an interesting fact I found.
The wife of Dr. Ottema, Sara van Heukelom (born Leiden 1805) died in the early morning of December 25, 1851.

### Posted 21 April 2012 - 08:03 AM
The backside of Jensma's "Het Oera Linda-boek" (2006):
(underlining by me)

The last four lines read:
This scientifically sound edition of the original manuscript contains facsimiles of the text, a transcription and a new translation. In his introduction, Jensma he outlines the history of its genesis.

Fortunately, science is still evolving.

### Posted 21 April 2012 - 02:22 PM
This might be interesting:

Vincent van den Bossche: Klankleer en vormleer in Thet Oera Linda Bok; Eindverhandeling voorgedragen tot het verkrijgen van de graad van Licentiaat in de Taal- en Letterkunde ~ Germaanse Talen (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 2000)

(essay to obtain Belgian academic masters degree, about phonology and morphology in OLB)
[found it later]

### Posted 21 April 2012 - 05:06 PM
Slightly right translations

[032/11]
ÉWA SÉIT AK. É-LIK WÉTER-LIK.
RJUCHT ÀND SLJUCHT AS WÉTER
THAT THRVCH NÉN STORNE-WIND
JEFTA AWET OWERS VRSTOREN IS.

[Ottema p.47]
Ewa (effen) beteekent ook gelijk, vlak als water,
recht en slecht gelijk water
dat door geen hevige wind
of iets anders verstoord is.
[Jensma p.135]
Êwa betekent ook: effen, gelijk water,
recht en slecht als water
dat door geen Stormwind
of iets anders verstoord is.
[Sandbach p.47]
"Eva" has also another meaning;
that is, tranquil, smooth, like water
that is not stirred
by a breath of wind.

[Raubenheimer p.341]
"Eva" also means tranquil,
smooth like water
that has not been disturbed by a strong wind
or something else.


New translations (closer to original) by me:
[Dutch]
ÉWA betekent ook: é-lijkwater-lijk (é = water);
recht en slecht (= vlak, glad) als water
dat door geen stormwind
of iets anders verstoord is.
[English]
ÉWA also means: é-likewater-like (é = water);
'right and slight' (= straight and smooth) as water
that was not disturbed by storm-wind
or something else.


~ ~ ~
The word SLJUCHT (or SLJOCHT) in the fragment above is known from Old- and Newfrisian, as adjective (flat, smooth), or noun (pavement).
Also well known from the expression "rjocht & sljocht" = simple & honest/ straight (eenvoudig & oprecht).

The word is related to the Dutch words:
slijten = to wear off/ out
(be)slechten = to settle, to level
slecht (adj.) = bad, ill, wrong, evil
sleets = worn
slet = slvt

In no Frisian or Dutch dictionary I found "slecht" (noun), exept:

Old-Westflemmish "slechte" (1285) = flat field (http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...1&lemma=slechte)
Westfrisian dictionary (1984) "slechie" = flattened ('geslechte') part of the road, sidewalk, footway, pavement

It appears twice in the OLB:

[094/21]
THÁ ADELA TO HIRA HUS UT VPPET SLECHT KÉM
FOL EN BLOMRÉIN DEL VPPIRA HOLE

[O+S p.131]
Toen Adela uit haar huis op de straat kwam
viel een bloemregen op haar hoofd
When Adele came out of her house [on the street],
a shower of flowers fell on her head


[105/04]
A SADENERA WISE SEND WI AN HÚSA KÉMEN MITH STOPPENBÀNKUM
EN SLECHT ÀND WARANDA LINDA WITH THA SVNNE-SRÉLUM

[O+S p.145]
Op zoodanige wijze zijn wij aan huizen gekomen met stoepbanken,
eene straat, en eene beschuttende linde tegen de zonnestralen
This is the way in which we became possessed of houses and porches,
a street, and lime-trees to protect us from the rays of the sun


It is remarkable that Jensma (2006), probably by mistake, made this ugly and incorrect translation:
"Op zo'n wijze zijn wij aan huizen gekomen met stoepbanken
en stoep en beschuttende linden tegen de zonnestralen."

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